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Dataset Overview | National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI)

Microplastic concentrations on sandy beaches along the northern coast of Taiwan from 2015-06-04 to 2015-09-14 (NCEI Accession 0277999)

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This study estimated the concentration of microplastics (i.e. plastics measuring less than 5mm, reported in unit of pieces/m3) on sandy beaches along the northern coast of Taiwan from 2015-06-04 to 2015-09-14. Microplastic data were collected using a metal scoop. This dataset contains the results from all 8 sediment samples, in a spreadsheet format.
  • Cite as: Kunz, Alexander; Walther, Bruno; Löwemark, Ludvig; Lee, Yao-Chang (2023). Microplastic concentrations on sandy beaches along the northern coast of Taiwan from 2015-06-04 to 2015-09-14 (NCEI Accession 0277999). [indicate subset used]. NOAA National Centers for Environmental Information. Dataset. https://www.ncei.noaa.gov/archive/accession/0277999. Accessed [date].
gov.noaa.nodc:0277999
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  • Excel
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Distributor NOAA National Centers for Environmental Information
+1-301-713-3277
NCEI.Info@noaa.gov
Dataset Point of Contact NOAA National Centers for Environmental Information
ncei.info@noaa.gov
Time Period 2015-06-04 to 2015-09-14
Spatial Bounding Box Coordinates
West: 121.4141
East: 121.9417
South: 25.0241
North: 25.2846
Spatial Coverage Map
General Documentation
Associated Resources
  • The NOAA NCEI Global Marine Microplastics Database (1972-present)
    • NCEI Collection
      Navigate directly to the URL for data access and direct download.
  • Kunz, A., Walther, B. A., Löwemark, L., & Lee, Y.-C. (2016). Distribution and quantity of microplastic on sandy beaches along the northern coast of Taiwan. Marine Pollution Bulletin, 111(1–2), 126–135. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.marpolbul.2016.07.022
  • Parent ID (indicates this dataset is related to other data):
    • gov.noaa.nodc:NCEI-Marine-Microplastics
Publication Dates
  • publication: 2023-05-12
Data Presentation Form Digital table - digital representation of facts or figures systematically displayed, especially in columns
Dataset Progress Status Complete - production of the data has been completed
Historical archive - data has been stored in an offline storage facility
Data Update Frequency As needed
Supplemental Information
Submission Package ID: DCK5W1
Purpose These microplastic concentration data were collected in order to determine the abundance of microplastics on sandy beaches along the northern coast of Taiwan from 2015-06-04 to 2015-09-14.
Use Limitations
  • accessLevel: Public
  • Distribution liability: NOAA and NCEI make no warranty, expressed or implied, regarding these data, nor does the fact of distribution constitute such a warranty. NOAA and NCEI cannot assume liability for any damages caused by any errors or omissions in these data. If appropriate, NCEI can only certify that the data it distributes are an authentic copy of the records that were accepted for inclusion in the NCEI archives.
Dataset Citation
  • Cite as: Kunz, Alexander; Walther, Bruno; Löwemark, Ludvig; Lee, Yao-Chang (2023). Microplastic concentrations on sandy beaches along the northern coast of Taiwan from 2015-06-04 to 2015-09-14 (NCEI Accession 0277999). [indicate subset used]. NOAA National Centers for Environmental Information. Dataset. https://www.ncei.noaa.gov/archive/accession/0277999. Accessed [date].
Cited Authors
Contributors
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Publishers
Theme keywords NODC DATA TYPES THESAURUS NODC OBSERVATION TYPES THESAURUS WMO_CategoryCode
  • oceanography
Global Change Master Directory (GCMD) Science Keywords
Data Center keywords NODC COLLECTING INSTITUTION NAMES THESAURUS NODC SUBMITTING INSTITUTION NAMES THESAURUS
Instrument keywords NODC INSTRUMENT TYPES THESAURUS Global Change Master Directory (GCMD) Instrument Keywords Provider Instruments
  • Metal scoop
Place keywords NODC SEA AREA NAMES THESAURUS Global Change Master Directory (GCMD) Location Keywords Provider Place Names
  • Pacific Ocean
Keywords NCEI ACCESSION NUMBER
Use Constraints
  • Cite as: Kunz, Alexander; Walther, Bruno; Löwemark, Ludvig; Lee, Yao-Chang (2023). Microplastic concentrations on sandy beaches along the northern coast of Taiwan from 2015-06-04 to 2015-09-14 (NCEI Accession 0277999). [indicate subset used]. NOAA National Centers for Environmental Information. Dataset. https://www.ncei.noaa.gov/archive/accession/0277999. Accessed [date].
Access Constraints
  • Use liability: NOAA and NCEI cannot provide any warranty as to the accuracy, reliability, or completeness of furnished data. Users assume responsibility to determine the usability of these data. The user is responsible for the results of any application of this data for other than its intended purpose.
Fees
  • In most cases, electronic downloads of the data are free. However, fees may apply for custom orders, data certifications, copies of analog materials, and data distribution on physical media.
Lineage information for: dataset
Processing Steps
  • 2023-05-12T15:40:27Z - NCEI Accession 0277999 v1.1 was published.
Output Datasets
Lineage information for: dataset
Processing Steps
  • Parameter or Variable: microplastic concentration (measured); Units: pieces/m3; Observation Category: in situ; Sampling Instrument: Metal scoop; Sampling and Analyzing Method: This study collected microplastic samples from four different sandy beaches along the northern coast of Taiwan: Shalun Beach, Baishawan Beach, Waimushan Beach and Fulong Beach. Shalun Beach and Baishawan Beach were sampled in August 2015, Waimushan Beach in September 2015 and Fulong Beach in June 2015. The study used the same sampling procedure for all beaches. Specifically, we always sampled one location during low tide and approximately in the middle of the intertidal zone. A 50 × 50 cm large metal frame was hammered into the sand. From this square, we collected two samples: the upper layer of 0–5 cm depth, and the layer immediately below (5–10 cm depth). Each sample thus represented a volume of 0.0125 m3. The sand was placed into metal buckets for transportation to the laboratory. No plastic tools or containers were used during sampling or laboratory work to avoid additional plastic contamination. Each of the eight sand samples was sieved using woven wire test sieves from Endecotts into the following grain size fractions: ≥4 mm, 2 mm, 1 mm, 0.5 mm, 0.25 mm, 0.125 mm and ≥0.038 mm. The grain size fractions were chosen following Wentworth's (1922) classification for sediments which allowed us to separate differently sized plastic particles. During sieving, the samples were washed with water to disintegrate aggregations and to remove sticky particles. The water was collected with a 0.038 mm sieve so that all potential plastic particles ≥0.038 mm were retained. After sieving, the individual grain size fractions were dried at 60 °C for two days Extraction of plastic particles was achieved by density separation using a saturated NaCl solution as density liquid. To avoid any additional contamination of the samples from the salt solution, it was filtered through a 5 μm paper filter (Advantec Filter Nr. 2) prior to use with the samples. Before its use, the density of the salt solution was also measured, and it was always 1.17 g/cm3. Separation of plastic particles from the sediment was achieved in two steps. In the first step, the dry sample was placed into an Erlenmeyer flask, then the salt solution was added, and then the mixture was vigorously shaken for 30 s. After the sediment had settled down, the supernatant was carefully poured through a sieve with 0.038 mm mesh size. This procedure was repeated at least five times or until there were no visible particles floating in the supernatant anymore. The particles collected in the sieve were washed with water to remove the salt and then dried for the second step. In the second step, the collected particles were cleaned and the remaining sand grains were removed. The procedure was similar to the first step, but this time a tall glass beaker instead of an Erlenmeyer flask was used because the solution was only stirred, not shaken. The second separation step was also repeated at least five times or until no visible particles were floating in the salt solution anymore. The extracted particles were washed and dried and then subjected to visual counting and FTIR spectroscopy in order to separate the plastic particles from the non-plastic particles.; Data Quality Method: For all the larger size fractions (≥0.25mm), the study counted all particles with a Greenough stereo microscope. Because of their characteristic shape, cleavage and color, most of the plastic particles were easily distinguished from the non-plastic particles, such as shell fragments, rocks, minerals or plant remnants. All the remaining particles that could not be identified as plastic or non-plastic during this initial step were then subjected to a test whereby each particle was dipped for one second into a diluted (5%) HCl solution in order to observe the chemical reaction. This step was also included to reduce the number of particles which had to be measured with FTIR spectroscopy. All carbonaceous materials showed the typical instantaneous bubbling reaction from the release of CO2 due to the reaction of HCl with the carbonate ion CO3 2 −. All other particles with a different or no reaction were treated as potential plastic. To avoid misinterpretation of the reaction, we tested the following black-colored plastic types (PE-HD, PVC, PP, PS, PUR, PLA) and a black piece of rubber for their reaction with HCl, but none of them showed any bubbling reaction. We also studied six chemical resistance data sheets on the internet which detail that the majority of plastic and elastomer types show no or weak reaction with diluted HCl at room temperature. All remaining particles were subjected for further analysis using FTIR spectroscopy to identify the plastic types. Attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy and synchrotron based FTIR (SR-FTIR) microspectroscopy were used to analyze the chemical components based on the characteristic IR absorption of functional groups of plastic polymers..
Acquisition Information (collection)
Instrument
  • Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometer
  • sediment sieve
Last Modified: 2024-07-11T14:03:46Z
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