National Overview

May Extreme Weather/Climate Events

May Highlights

May Temperature

The contiguous U.S. average temperature during May was 62.3°F, 2.1°F above average, ranking 13th warmest in the 130-year record.

Generally, temperatures were above average across much of the eastern contiguous U.S. including Florida. Conversely, near- to below-average temperatures were observed in portions of the central and northern Rocky Mountains.

For the month of May, Florida ranked warmest on record. Thirteen additional states ranked among their top-10 warmest May on record.

The contiguous U.S. average maximum (daytime) temperature during May was 74.7°F, 1.8°F above the 20th century average, ranking 25th warmest on record. Maximum temperatures were above average along parts of the West Coast, from the Southwest to the Northeast and in portions of the Southeast. Near- to below-average temperatures were observed in parts of the central and northern Rocky Mountains and Pacific Northwest. Florida ranked warmest for daytime high temperatures in May.

The contiguous U.S. average minimum (nighttime) temperature during May was 49.9°F, 2.5°F above the 20th century average, ranking 8th warmest in the historical record. Minimum temperatures were above average along portions of the West Coast and from the Deep South and eastern Plains to the East Coast. Nighttime temperatures were near or below average from the Pacific Northwest to the Four Corners region and into the western Plains. Florida, Louisiana, Maine, New Hampshire, New York and Vermont each ranked warmest on record, while eleven additional states experienced a top-5 warmest May for nighttime temperatures.

The Alaska statewide May temperature was 38.3°F, 0.5°F above the long-term average. This ranked in the middle third of the 100-year period of record for the state. Monthly temperatures were near to below average across much of the state, with near- to above-average temperatures observed across much of the north and portions of the eastern Southeast Interior and Northeast Gulf regions.

Based on NOAA's Residential Energy Demand Temperature Index (REDTI), the contiguous U.S. temperature-related energy demand during May was 109 percent of average and the 53rd-highest value in the 130-year period of record.

May Precipitation

The May precipitation total for the contiguous U.S. was 3.56 inches, 0.65 inch above average, ranking 13th wettest in the historical record.

Precipitation was above average in portions of the Plains, South, Southeast, Midwest, and Tennessee Valley. Precipitation was below average across much of the Southwest, Rio Grande Valley, and southern Florida.

Kentucky, Tennessee and Rhode Island each had their sixth wettest on record. Three additional states ranked among their top 10 wettest May on record. No state experienced a top-10 driest month for May.

Across the state of Alaska, the average monthly precipitation ranked in the driest third of the historical record. Precipitation was above average from Bristol Bay to the Central Panhandle, while below-normal precipitation was observed in parts of the Aleutian Islands during the month.

According to the May 28 U.S. Drought Monitor, about 13.6% of the contiguous U.S. was in drought, down about 4.4% from the end of April. Drought conditions expanded or intensified across western Kansas, eastern Colorado, southeastern Wyoming, parts of the Northwest and Florida this month. Drought contracted or was reduced in intensity across much of the Upper Midwest, Midwest, Northern Rockies and parts of Hawaii.

Billion-Dollar Weather and Climate Disasters

Four new billion-dollar weather and climate disasters were confirmed this month, including two tornado events that impacted the central, southern and eastern U.S. at the end of April and beginning of May, one severe weather event that impacted the central and eastern U.S. at the end of February and a derecho event that impacted portions of the South in mid-May.

There have been 11 confirmed weather and climate disaster events, each with losses exceeding $1 billion, this year. These disasters consisted of nine severe storm events and two winter storms. The total cost of these events exceeds $25 billion, and they have resulted in 84 direct and indirect fatalities.

The U.S. has sustained 387 separate weather and climate disasters since 1980 where overall damages/costs reached or exceeded $1 billion (including CPI adjustment to 2024). The total cost of these 387 events exceeds $2.740 trillion.

Other Notable Events

  • Heavy rains during the first week of May prompted more than 200 rescues and two fatalities in Harris and Bosque Counties in Texas.
  • Anchorage finished up the snowfall season with the second-highest snowfall total on record (133.3 inches).
Persistent heat brought record-breaking temperatures to portions of the U.S. during May:
  • Approximately 190 million people, across portions of the Northeast, southern Texas and Florida, experienced their top-10 warmest May on record.
  • It was the 13th warmest May, sixth warmest March-May and the fifth warmest January-May period on record for the contiguous U.S.
  • A total of 893 counties experienced their top-10 warmest May on record. For the year-to-date period, 66 counties were record warm while an additional 2,032 counties ranked in the top-10 for this January-May period. There are 3,143 counties in the U.S.
  • Temperatures in the Ohio Valley, Southeast and South ranked second, third and third warmest on record, respectively, for the March-May period, while minimum temperatures in the Northeast and South ranked second warmest on record for this spring period.
Several notable storms impacted portions of the U.S. in May:
  • On May 1, a rare anti-cyclonic tornado occurred in Tillman County, Oklahoma. Normally tornadoes rotate counter-clockwise in the Northern Hemisphere and this was the 29th reported clockwise tornado since 1950.
  • On May 4-5, a late season cold snowstorm brought heavy snowfall to the northern Sierra Nevada. Remarkably, this was the snowiest day (24-hour period) of the entire season with Donner Summit, California receiving 26.4 inches of snow in 24 hours.
  • On May 6-10, a severe weather outbreak brought at least one tornado (including one EF-4) to twenty-three states from South Dakota to Florida, causing heavy damage and loss of life.
  • On May 8-9, severe storms tracked through the Southeast producing damaging winds, heavy rains and tornadoes. Up to nine inches of rain prompted flash flood emergencies, water rescues and school closures just north of Nashville, Tennessee.
  • On May 16, a derecho with winds up to 100 mph occurred in Houston, Texas and tracked through Louisiana, causing significant damage and at least eight fatalities.
  • On May 21, the deadliest tornado for the year-to-date was an EF-4 that occurred in Greenfield, Iowa causing significant damage and five fatalities.
  • On May 28, the National Weather Service issued a warning for DVD-sized hail (5 inches in diameter) for Hockley County, Texas, making this the first warning for hail that large on record.

Spring Highlights

March-May Temperature

The meteorological spring (March-May) average temperature for the contiguous U.S. was 53.7°F, 2.8°F above average, tying with 2016 as the sixth-warmest spring on record.

Temperatures were above average from the Great Plains to the East Coast.

Arkansas, Kentucky, Ohio, Virginia, and West Virginia each ranked second warmest on record for this spring season.

The contiguous U.S. average maximum (daytime) temperature during March-May was 65.7°F, 2.6°F above the 20th century average, ranking 13th warmest on record. Above-average temperatures were observed across much of the eastern contiguous U.S. and in parts of the Midwest and central and southern Plains, with near average temperatures dominating much of the West. Illinois, Missouri and West Virginia each ranked third warmest, with eighteen additional states experiencing a top-10 warmest March-May for daytime temperatures. No state experienced a top-10 coldest spring on record for this three-month period.

The contiguous U.S. average minimum (nighttime) temperature during this three-month period was 41.6°F, 2.9°F above the 20th century average, ranking third warmest in the historical record. Above-average nighttime temperatures were observed from the Plains to the East Coast and across portions of the West. Near- to below-normal temperatures were observed in pockets across the West. Ohio and Pennsylvania ranked warmest on record for nighttime temperatures, with thirteen additional states experiencing their second warmest March-May for nighttime temperatures. No state experienced a top-10 coldest event for nighttime temperatures this spring season.

The Alaska spring temperature was 26.8°F, 2.8°F above the long-term average, ranking in the warmest third of the record for the state. Temperatures were above average across much of the state, while parts of the Panhandle and Aleutians saw near-average spring temperatures.

Based on REDTI, the contiguous U.S. temperature-related energy demand during March-May was 39 percent of average and was the 7th-lowest value on record.

March-May Precipitation

The contiguous U.S. spring precipitation total was 9.25 inches, 1.32 inch above average, ranking in the wettest third of the March-May record.

Precipitation was above average from the Midwest to the Northeast, and in parts of the Gulf Coast and Southeast. Rhode Island ranked third wettest while Iowa and Wisconsin each ranked fourth wettest on record for the spring season.

Spring precipitation was below average in the Rio Grande Valley, southern Florida, and parts of the Southwest, central Plains, and Pacific Northwest during the March-May period.

For spring season precipitation, Alaska ranked in the middle third of the record with near- to wetter-than-average conditions observed across most of the state. Precipitation was below average in parts of the Cook Inlet, the South Panhandle and the Aleutians.

Extremes

The U.S. Climate Extremes Index (USCEI) for the spring period was 21 percent above average, ranking in the upper third of the 115-year period of record. The USCEI is an index that tracks extremes (occurring in the upper or lower 10 percent of the record) in temperature, precipitation and drought across the contiguous United States.

On the regional scale, the South, Southeast, Upper Midwest and Ohio Valley each ranked much-above average, and the Northeast experienced its most extreme March-May period on record. Each of these regions experienced elevated extremes in warm maximum temperatures, warm minimum temperatures. The Northeast also had elevated extremes in wet PDSI and days with precipitation. Conversely, extremes across the Northwest were 91 percent below average ranking as its third lowest spring period on record.


Year-to-Date Highlights

January-May Temperature

For the January-May period, the average contiguous U.S. temperature was 46.8°F, 3.4°F above average, ranking fifth warmest on record for this period.

Temperatures were above average across nearly all of the contiguous U.S., while record-warm temperatures were observed in parts of the Northeast and Great Lakes.

Illinois, Indiana, Ohio, Michigan, New York, Vermont, New Hampshire and Maine each had their second warmest January-May period. An additional 16 states had a top-5 warmest year-to-date period. No state experienced a top-10 coldest event for this five-month period.

The contiguous U.S. average maximum (daytime) temperature during January-May was 58.1°F, 3.1°F above the 20th century average, ranking sixth warmest on record. Above-average temperatures were observed across much of the contiguous U.S. with pockets of near average temperatures evident across parts of the West, Deep South and Southeast. Illinois, Indiana, Ohio, Michigan, Missouri and West Virginia each ranked second warmest on record for daytime temperatures during the January-May period, while 19 additional states ranked among their top-10 warmest January-May on record for daytime temperatures. No state experienced a top-10 coldest on record for this five-month period.

The contiguous U.S. average minimum (nighttime) temperature during this five-month period was 35.5°F, 3.7°F above the 20th century average, ranking 15th warmest in the historical record. Above-average nighttime temperatures were observed across nearly all of the Lower 48, while near record temperatures were observed in parts of the Deep South, Great Lakes and Northeast. Maryland, Michigan, New York, New Hampshire and Vermont each ranked warmest on record, while 26 additional states ranked among their top-10 warmest January-May period on record for nighttime temperatures.

The Alaska January-May temperature was 18.9°F, 3.2°F above the long-term average, ranking in the warmest third of the historical record for the state. Much of the state was above-average for the five-month period while temperatures were near average across parts of the Panhandle.

Based on REDTI, the contiguous U.S. temperature-related energy demand during January-May was 26 percent of average and was the third-lowest value on record.

January-May Precipitation

The January-May precipitation total for the contiguous U.S. was 14.57 inches, 2.19 inches above average, ranking in the wettest third of the 130-year record.

Precipitation was above average across much of the contiguous U.S. Rhode Island had the second wettest year-to-date. Seven additional states ranked among their top-10 wettest on record for this five-month period.

Conversely, precipitation was below average across parts Northwest, central and southern Plains and Florida during the January-May period. No states ranked among their top-10 driest year-to-date period on record.

The January-May precipitation ranked in the middle third of the 100-year record for Alaska, with below-average precipitation observed across parts of the Aluetians, Central Interior, Cook Inlet and South Panhandle regions, near-average precipitation in the Northeast Interior and above-average precipitation observed across much of the remaining climate divisions.

Extremes

The U.S. Climate Extremes Index (USCEI) for the year-to-date period was 48 percent above average, ranking in the upper third of the 115-year period of record. Extremes in warm maximum temperatures, warm minimum temperatures and 1-day precipitation were the major contributors to this elevated CEI value. The USCEI is an index that tracks extremes (occurring in the upper or lower 10 percent of the record) in temperature, precipitation and drought across the contiguous United States.

On the regional scale, the Ohio Valley, South and Upper Midwest ranked much-above average, and the Northeast experienced its most extreme year-to-date period. Each of these regions experienced elevated extremes in warm maximum temperatures and warm minimum temperatures. The Northeast also experienced elevated extremes in wet PDSI and days with precipitation. Conversely, extremes across the West were 83 percent below average ranking eighth lowest year-to-date period on record.

Monthly Outlook

According to the May 31 One-Month Outlook from the Climate Prediction Center, above-average temperatures are favored to impact areas across the western half of the U.S. in June, while above-normal monthly total precipitation is favored from the Lower Mississippi Valley to the central Rockies. Drought is likely to persist along portions of the Northern Tier, the Southwest, Florida and Hawaii.

According to the One-Month Outlook issued on June 1 from the National Interagency Fire Center, portions of the Southwest and Florida Peninsula have above-normal significant wildland fire potential during June.


Regional Highlights

These regional summaries were provided by the six Regional Climate Centers and reflect conditions in their respective regions. These six regions differ spatially from the nine climatic regions of the National Centers for Environmental Information.

This month marks the 200th report submitted by the Regional Climate Centers since they first started writing them in October 2007!

Northeast (Information provided by the Northeast Regional Climate Center)

While May featured warm temperatures and variable precipitation, the spring season was decidedly warm and wet.

Temperature

The Northeast had its ninth-warmest May in 130 years of recordkeeping, with an average temperature of 60.7 degrees F, 3.7 degrees F above normal. This May ranked among the 20 warmest Mays on record for all 12 Northeast states: Vermont, fifth warmest; Maine, New Hampshire, and New York, sixth warmest; Connecticut; seventh warmest; Massachusetts and Rhode Island, ninth warmest; New Jersey and Pennsylvania, 11th warmest; West Virginia, 12th warmest; Maryland, 13th warmest; and Delaware, 19th warmest. Average temperatures for the states ranged from 1.4 degrees F above normal in Delaware to 4.5 degrees F above normal in Vermont. Spring 2024 was the fourth-warmest spring since 1895 for the Northeast, with an average temperature of 49.6 degrees F, 3.7 degrees F above normal. Average temperatures for spring for the 12 Northeast states ranged from 2.0 degrees F above normal in Delaware to 4.1 degrees F above normal in New York. This spring was the second warmest on record for West Virginia and the third warmest for Maine, Maryland, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania. It was the fourth-warmest spring on record for Connecticut, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New York, Rhode Island, and Vermont. Meanwhile, Delaware saw its seventh warmest spring. Additionally, it was the warmest spring on record for Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania; Huntington, West Virginia; and Elkins, West Virginia.

Precipitation

During May, the Northeast received 3.82 inches of precipitation, which was 96 percent of normal. May precipitation for the 12 Northeast states ranged from 69 percent of normal in Delaware to 189 percent of normal in Rhode Island, making it the state’s sixth-wettest May. Overall, eight of the states experienced a drier-than-normal May. The Northeast had its 13th wettest spring since records began in 1895, receiving 13.57 inches of precipitation, 120 percent of normal. Spring precipitation for the 12 Northeast states ranged from 97 percent of normal in West Virginia, the lone drier-than-normal state, to 162 percent of normal in Rhode Island. Spring 2024 ranked among the 20 wettest springs on record for eight of the states: Rhode Island, third wettest; Massachusetts, fifth wettest; Connecticut, seventh wettest; Pennsylvania, 10th wettest; New Hampshire, 11th wettest; New Jersey, 13th wettest; Maine, 14th wettest; and Vermont, 17th wettest.

Drought

The U.S. Drought Monitor from May 7 showed abnormal dryness covered three percent of the Northeast, including northwestern Maine and parts of western and central New York. Due to factors such as reduced soil moisture, below-normal groundwater levels, and continued precipitation deficits, abnormal dryness persisted in western/central New York, expanded slightly in northwestern Maine, and was introduced on the Delmarva Peninsula and in a small section of eastern West Virginia. The U.S. Drought Monitor from May 28 showed four percent of the Northeast as abnormally dry.

Notable Weather

Severe thunderstorms produced multiple tornadoes in the Northeast during a four-day period during the first half of May. On May 8, three tornadoes caused damage in the region: two in Pennsylvania and one that traveled from eastern Ohio, across West Virginia’s Northern Panhandle, and into western Pennsylvania. The two tornadoes in Pennsylvania were rated EF-1 tornadoes, with damage mostly consisting off snapped and downed trees. The multistate tornado was rated EF-2 and was the first tornado since records began in 1950 in Hancock County, West Virginia. This tornado caused extensive tree and structural damage, resulting in one person being injured. The next day, on May 9, two tornadoes touched down in West Virginia: an EF-0 in Preston County, its first tornado since 2008, and an EF-1 in Wood County, its strongest tornado since 2010. Both tornadoes damaged trees, while the EF-1 also flipped over a mobile home, injuring a person. Five tornadoes touched down in the region on May 11. The strongest tornado was an EF-2 in Washington County, Pennsylvania, that damaged trees and multiple homes and buildings, causing two people to sustain minor injuries. An EF-1 tornado traveled from Fayette County, Pennsylvania, into Preston County, West Virginia, making it the first time since 1950 that Preston County had two tornadoes in the same month and only the second time on record to have two tornadoes in a year. Fayette County, Pennsylvania, also saw an EF-0 tornado, while two EF-1 tornadoes caused tree damage in Garrett County, Maryland. Four tornadoes touched down in Pennsylvania on May 17, damaging trees and removed shingles and siding from some homes. Between May 25 and 29, there were four tornadoes in Pennsylvania and one in West Virginia. The Northeast’s tornado count for May was 19, more than three times the May average of six (based on data from 1998 to 2022). Pennsylvania had 14 tornadoes, but averages four in May, while West Virginia had five tornadoes, but averages zero in May. Meanwhile, Maryland had two tornadoes, with a May average of one. The area served by the National Weather Service in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, had its greatest number of tornadoes for May since records began in 1950.

For more information, please visit the Northeast Regional Climate Center Home Page.

Midwest Region (Information provided by the Midwest Regional Climate Center)

Temperature

The preliminary average May temperature for the Midwest was 62.5 degrees F (16.9 degrees C), which was 2.8 degrees F (1.6 degrees C) above the 1991-2020 normal. Temperatures were slightly above normal in the northwest portion of the region, increasing up to 6 degrees F (3.3 degrees C) above normal across the Ohio River Valley. Preliminary statewide average temperatures ranged from 1.4 degrees F (0.8 degrees C) above normal in Minnesota to 4.6 degrees F (2.6 degrees C) above normal in Ohio. Preliminary rankings indicate Ohio tied for the 9th warmest May since 1895. Muskegon, Michigan, had its 4th warmest May in 128 years, with an average temperature of 62.5 degrees F (16.9 degrees F). Over a dozen long-running stations across the southeastern Midwest, including locations in southern Illinois, Indiana, Ohio, and Michigan, had a top ten warmest May. The average spring (March-May) temperature for the Midwest was 3.4 degrees F (1.9 degrees C) above normal, with each of the three months in this period running 2.8-4.6 degrees F (1.6-2.6 degrees C) above normal. Preliminary rankings indicate that spring 2024 was tied for the 4th warmest on record.

Precipitation

Preliminary May precipitation totaled 5.71 inches (145 mm) for the Midwest, which was 1.33 inches (34 mm) above normal, or 130 percent of normal. Preliminary rankings indicate the Midwest had its 2nd wettest spring since 1895. Precipitation totals were 2-8 inches (50.8-152.4 mm) above normal in the region's northwest and far southern portions, which is over 200 percent of normal for many locations. Precipitation was within 2 inches (50.8 mm) above or below normal across the central Midwest. Preliminary statewide precipitation totals ranged from near normal in Illinois to just over 3 inches (76.2 mm) above normal in Iowa and Kentucky. Preliminary rankings indicate that both Iowa and Kentucky had their wettest May on record. Minnesota had their 3rd wettest May. Scottsville, Kentucky, had its 2nd wettest May in 78 years, with 12.61 inches (320.3 mm) of rainfall. Numerous stations across the northern half of Iowa had a wettest or 2nd wettest May, with rainfall totaling 8-11 inches (203.2-279.4 mm). Spring (March-May) precipitation for the Midwest totaled 12.79 inches (324.9 mm), which was 2.17 inches (55.1 mm) above normal.

Drought

Ample precipitation across the region supported continued drought improvement throughout May. Less than 1 percent of the region was in drought by month’s end, and just 7 percent had abnormally dry conditions. After 203 consecutive weeks, the removal of drought conditions in Iowa in late May marked the first time since June 2020 that the state was completely drought-free.

Notable Weather

While May is typically a stormy month across the Midwest, this year was unusually active. Regionwide, there were 219 preliminary tornado reports, which is about 4.5 times the median number of reports from 2000-2021 and the greatest number of preliminary May tornado reports since 2000. There were 1,188 preliminary wind reports and 482 preliminary hail reports, both above May's long-term median count.

There were several notable events during the month. Over 30 confirmed tornadoes touched down from Iowa and Missouri eastward through Ohio on May 6-7, with hundreds of hail and wind reports, including reports of 4-inch (10.2 cm) diameter hail in Michigan. On May 21, an EF-4 tornado cut a 44-mile (70.8 km) path across southeast Iowa, resulting in 5 fatalities, while a broader swath of severe storms affected Iowa, Minnesota, Illinois, and Wisconsin. A long-lived complex of intense winds (derecho) and about 20 confirmed tornadoes traversed Iowa and Illinois on May 24. A large severe weather outbreak across the lower Midwest brought over 750 preliminary severe weather reports on May 26 and fatalities in Missouri and Kentucky.

For further details on the weather and climate events in the Midwest, see the weekly and monthly reports at the Midwest Climate Watch page.

Southeast (Information provided by the Southeast Regional Climate Center)

Temperature

Temperatures were above average across most of the Southeast in May. The greatest departures were found across southern portions of Alabama and Georgia, and nearly all of Florida, where mean temperatures were 4 to 6 degrees F (2.2 to 3.4 degrees C) above average for the month. Mean temperatures were 2 to 3 degrees F (1.1 to 1.8 degrees C) above average across the rest of the region, except in central portions of Alabama, Georgia, and South Carolina, and extreme eastern North Carolina and Virginia, where temperatures were near average for the month. Several locations in Florida recorded their warmest May on record, including Orlando (1892-2024), Tampa Bay (1890-2024), Fort Myers (1902-2024), West Palm Beach (1888-2024), Sarasota (1911-2024), Punta Gorda (1914-2024), Melbourne (1937-2024), Vero Beach (1942-2024), Miami (1895-2024), Key West (1871-2024), and Fort Lauderdale (1912-2024). Daytona Beach, FL (1923-2024), Fort Pierce, FL (1901-2024), Mobile, AL (1871-2024), and Valdosta, GA (1948-2024) recorded their second warmest May on record, while Tallahassee, FL (1896-2024) and Charleston, SC (1938-2024) recorded their third warmest.

The heat across Florida was especially noteworthy. On the 11th, Fort Lauderdale recorded a monthly record maximum temperature of 98 degrees F (36.7 degrees C), which is 2 degrees F (1.1 degrees C) shy of its all-time highest maximum temperature (since 1912). A few days later on the 14th, Fort Lauderdale tied its all-time highest minimum temperature of 85 degrees F (29.4 degrees C), which had previously been observed in the month of August. Also, on the 14th (and again on the 18th), Key West tied its second highest monthly maximum temperature of 93 degrees F (33.9 degrees C). The next day, Key West recorded a heat index of 114 degrees F (45.6 degrees C), which shattered its previous record for May and came within 1 degree F (0.5 degrees C) of its highest value on record (since 1948). The heat index in Miami reached 112 degrees F (44.4 degrees C) on the 18th and 19th, which shattered the previous record for May by 6 degrees F (3.3 degrees C) and is just 2 degrees F (1.1 degrees C) shy of its highest value on record (since 1948), which was set last summer. Also on the 19th, Miami recorded its highest daily mean monthly temperature of 89 degrees F (31.7 degrees C), which also ranks in the top 10 warmest days for any month on record (since 1895). In nearby West Palm Beach, the heat index reached 115 degrees F (46.1 degrees C), which tied its highest value for May and came within 2 degrees F (1.1 degrees C) of its highest value on record (since 1943). On the 28th, the temperature in West Palm Beach reached 99 degrees F (37.2 degrees C), which tied its highest May value and is just 2 degrees F (1.1 degrees C) shy of its highest all-time maximum temperature on record (since 1888). It is also the highest temperature recorded at West Palm Beach since 2006. On the 30th, Tampa tied its highest monthly maximum temperature of 98 degrees F (36.7 degrees C), which is just 1 degree F (1.1 degrees C) shy of its all-time highest maximum temperature (since 1890). Further south in Punta Gorda, the temperature reached 101 degrees F (38.3 degrees C), which tied its all-time highest maximum temperature (since 1914).

Temperatures were above average across Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands. San Juan, PR recorded its warmest May on record (since 1898). On the 12th and 21st, San Juan reached 95 degrees F (35 degrees C), which is just 1 degree F (0.5 degrees C) shy of its highest monthly maximum temperature on record. Extreme heat was also recorded on Saint Croix, with the heat index reaching 116 degrees F (46.7 degrees C) on the 5th and 115 degrees F (46.1 degrees C) on the 26th.

Precipitation

Following a relatively dry April, precipitation in May was above average across much of the region. The wettest locations were found across the Florida Panhandle, northern and southern portions of Alabama and Georgia, and central and western portions of the Carolinas, where monthly totals were 4 to 8 inches (102 to 203 mm) above average (150 to 300 percent of normal). Danville, VA recorded its wettest May on record (since 1903) with 9.41 inches (239 mm), breaking the previous record of 8.23 inches (209 mm) set in 2003. Marion, NC recorded its second wettest May on record (since 1893) with 14.45 inches (367 mm), while Greensboro, NC (1903-2024) and Harrisonburg, VA (1893-2024) recorded their third wettest May on record with 8.73 inches (222 mm) and 8.11 inches (206 mm), respectively. Other notable monthly totals include 10.28 inches (261 mm) in Mobile, AL (191 percent of normal), 7.69 inches (195 mm) in Tallahassee, FL (229 percent of normal), 7.69 inches (195 mm) in Alma, GA (277 percent of normal), and 8.78 inches (223 mm) in Newton, GA (361 percent of normal). Mobile, AL recorded 6.85 inches (174 mm) on the 13th, which is the third wettest May day on record (since 1871). On the 18th, Moultrie, GA, located in the southern part of the state, recorded its wettest May day on record (since 1911) with 4.33 inches (110 mm), breaking the previous record of 4.23 inches (107 mm) set on May 6, 1956. A couple of days later, Marathon Key, FL recorded its wettest May day on record (since 1950) with 7.08 inches (180 mm) on the 20th, which also ranks as the fifth wettest day for any month.

In contrast, precipitation was below average across much of the Florida Peninsula, as well as central portions of Alabama, Georgia, South Carolina, and Virginia. The driest locations were found across parts of central and southern Florida, where monthly totals were over 4 inches (102 mm) below average in places (less than 25 percent of normal). Several locations, including Tampa, West Palm Beach, and Fort Lauderdale, recorded around 1 inch (25 mm) of precipitation, while Naples and Sarasota recorded less than an inch.

Precipitation was above average across much of Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands. For the second straight month, San Juan recorded more than twice its normal monthly total with 11.51 inches (292 mm). Aibonito, PR recorded 10.60 inches (269 mm), which is also more than twice its normal monthly total. The highest monthly total on the island was 20.16 inches (512 mm) at the Maricao Fish Hatchery, located along the western slopes of the Cordillera Central mountain range. This value ranks as the fifth wettest May on record (since 1955). Monthly totals across the U.S. Virgin Islands ranged from 6 to 12 inches (152 to 305 mm). A COOP station at the University of the Virgin Islands on Saint Croix recorded 10.68 inches (271 mm), which ranks as the fifth wettest month on record (since 1972). Of this, 6.49 inches (165 mm) fell on the 6th, which is the wettest May day and third wettest for any day on record. Heavy rain and flooding also affected the region on the 3rd and 4th of the month. Between 2 and 5 inches (51 and 127 mm) fell across much of the U.S. Virgin Islands, while over 5 inches (127 mm) was recorded along the eastern end of Puerto Rico.

Drought

Drought conditions improved across the northern half of the region and in the Caribbean but worsened across much of South Florida. By the end of the month, only small pockets of abnormal dryness (D0) were found scattered across parts of Alabama, the Carolinas, and Virginia, while Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands were free of any drought or abnormal dryness. On the other hand, moderate (D1) drought expanded across much of the southern half of the Florida Peninsula, with a band of severe (D2) drought emerging across the Citrus Belt from just north of Fort Myers to Lake Okeechobee.

Agriculture

Wet conditions limited field activities and delayed planting across much of the region. Some crops, particularly cotton, had to be replanted. Fungal diseases were also reported. Crop damage was noted from high winds and hail. The heat and lack of rain across the Citrus Belt of Florida required extra irrigation as ponds were drying up. Pastures and cattle also showed signs of heat and drought stress. On the other hand, peaches and blueberries were abundant due to adequate growing degree days and a lack of frost damage from earlier in the year. Additionally, the unseasonably warm and dry weather across eastern North Carolina allowed farmers to plant cotton early.

Notable Weather

There were 1,043 reports of severe weather across the Southeast in May, which is more than double the median frequency of 453 reports over the period 2000 to 2022 (228 percent of normal). There were 57 confirmed tornadoes (18 EF-0s, 31 EF-1s, 6 EF-2s, 2 EF-3s), which is more than five times the median frequency of 11 tornadoes and the fifth most tornadoes recorded in the Southeast in the month of May since 1950 (the record is 76 tornadoes in 1973). Forty-two of these tornadoes occurred as part of a severe weather outbreak that affected a large portion of the region from the 8th to the 10th of the month. Two EF-3 tornadoes were observed in northern Alabama on the evening of the 8th. One caused substantial damage to trees, homes, and vehicles in the Brigadoon neighborhood along the Tennessee River in Limestone County. The other caused significant damage to the east in Jackson County, where mobile homes were shifted off of their foundations, outbuildings were destroyed, and some well-built homes were partially destroyed by wind and fallen trees. Some debris from these homes were found impaled nearly two feet into the ground. A tractor trailer parked along a county road was tossed over 150 yards (137 m). At least seven people were injured. In addition, two EF-2 tornadoes touched down in Leon County, FL on the morning of the 10th. These tornadoes would eventually converge around downtown Tallahassee, causing considerable damage to trees at Capital City Country Club. One of the tornadoes tracked to the south of Interstate-10 west of Tallahassee, causing considerable damage to parts of the Florida State University campus. Of note, the tent housing the university’s Flying High Circus was destroyed and part of the outfield fence at Dick Howser Stadium, home to the university’s baseball team, was severely damaged. Significant tree damage was also noted on the campuses of Lively Technical College and Tallahassee Community College. The other tornado tracked to the south along Highway 20, causing damage to an elementary school and snapping and uprooting trees on the campus of Florida A&M University. Roof damage was also reported on a few university buildings. On the 2nd, a waterspout made landfall on Albacoa Beach in Arecibo, PR, causing mostly minor damage to mangrove trees. Several weak tornadoes were reported across eastern portions of the Carolinas on the 14th and across eastern portions of North Carolina and northern Virginia on the 26th and 27th. One of these touched down in the community of Rixeyville, VA. Five people were injured when the shed they were occupying overturned.

There were 815 wind reports in May, which is more than two and a half times the median frequency of 300 reports (272 percent of normal). The severe weather outbreak from the 8th to the 10th produced straight-line winds of 50 to 60 mph (22 to 27 m/s) across the Carolinas. Charlotte, NC recorded a gust of 56 mph (25 m/s) on the 8th, which is the highest May gust on record (since 1941). A WeatherSTEM station at the Bank of America stadium in downtown Charlotte recorded a gust of 59 mph (26 m/s) that same day. On the 10th, straight-line winds in excess of 60 mph (27 m/s) were observed across coastal Alabama and the Florida Panhandle. Some gusts were estimated at over 100 mph (45 m/s) around Mobile and in parts of northwest Florida. Pensacola, FL (1948-2024) and Tallahassee, FL (1942-2024) recorded their highest May gusts on record with values of 64 mph (29 m/s) and 66 mph (30 m/s), respectively. A weather station on the campus of Florida A&M University recorded a gust of 84 mph (38 m/s). These winds caused significant damage to trees and buildings, including the home of the Florida State Climatologist. Some homes were completely destroyed by falling trees, and building materials were launched hundreds of yards. On the 13th, the Naval Air Station at Whiting Field in northwest Florida recorded a gust of 82 mph (37 m/s), which is the highest gust on record for any day (since 1945). Estimated gusts of 85 to 95 mph (38 to 42 m/s) were also noted around Mobile, resulting in snapped and uprooted trees, some of which fell on homes and outbuildings. The next day, Tampa, FL recorded a 71 mph (32 m/s) wind gust, which is the third highest gust on record for any day (since 1940). One day later, Wilmington, NC recorded a wind gust of 58 mph (26 m/s), its third highest gust on record for any May day (since 1942). On the 17th, another round of straight-line winds blew through northern Florida. Most gusts were 40 to 60 mph (18 to 27 m/s), with some higher gusts, including 87 mph (39 m/s) just south of Panama City. On the 19th, Beaufort, SC recorded a gust of 68 mph (30 m/s), which is the highest gust on record for any May day (since 1945). A large complex of severe thunderstorms moved across central Alabama on the morning of the 27th, with estimated winds between 60 and 75 mph (27 and 34 m/s). There were numerous reports of downed trees and power lines. One person was killed in Jefferson County when a tree fell on their home.

There were 171 hail reports in May, which is above the median frequency of 142 reports (120 percent of normal). The largest hailstone was 4 inches (102 mm), or softball-sized, in the community of Holly Springs, AL, located northeast of Birmingham, on the 10th of the month. More large hail was observed on the 8th, including 3 inch (76 mm) hailstones in Buncombe County, NC. These are the largest hailstones recorded in western North Carolina in the past two decades and one of the top 5 largest hailstones on record (since 1950). Also of note, one of the strongest geomagnetic storms of the past two decades occurred around the middle of the month. Fortunately, a lack of cloud cover allowed many folks across the southern tier of the region (including parts of Florida) to enjoy a rare view of the Northern Lights.

For more information, please visit the Southeast Regional Climate Center Home Page.

High Plains (Information provided by the High Plains Regional Climate Center)

May featured a steady stream of severe weather, with Kansas and Nebraska hit the hardest. More tornadoes struck Nebraska, while Kansas received large hail and exceptionally strong winds. Nearly all weather phenomena were experienced in the region this month, with parts of North Dakota receiving snow late in the month.

Kansas was pummeled by large hail this month, with two days featuring stones over 4 inches (10.16 cm). A destructive derecho also impacted the central part of the state on the 19th, uprooting trees and destroying buildings. Winds reached 100 mph (161 km/h) in Salina and were above 60 mph (97 km/h) as far east as Kansas City.

Although there have been numerous tornadoes this month in Nebraska, the maximum rating was an EF2 near Lake McConaughy on the 23rd. A preliminary total of 34 were reported this month, more than double their average of 15. Through the end of May, 81 have been reported, which is nearly 30 more than the yearly average at this point of the year. With June being the peak of tornadic activity in the state, they could position themselves to break their annual record this year.

The steady stream of storms finally led to flooding late in the month. Nearly 7 inches (17.78 cm) of rain fell in parts of a small area across eastern Nebraska stretching from David City to Omaha. Roads were closed, and cars were left stranded due to the flash flooding.

Temperature

Temperatures were split across the region, with the west below and the east above normal this month. Parts of northwestern Colorado were 5 to 7 degrees F (2.8 to 3.9 degrees C) below normal, thanks to exceptionally cool minimum temperatures. Overall, there were no major locations that ranked in the top 10 for May.

Average minimum temperatures across Colorado were slightly below normal, however, portions west of the Rockies were near or at record lows. Towns such as Meeker were nearly 8 degrees F (4.4 degrees C) below their normal average lows, which also extended into parts of southwestern Wyoming. Despite the cooler temperatures, there were no records broken.

This spring was rather warm across Kansas, with many locations ranking among the warmest. Concordia and Topeka ranked 3rd, while Wichita tied for 4th. To the west, Dodge City ranked 7th. Outside of a few minor heatwaves, temperatures in Kansas remained consistently slightly above normal. Elsewhere in the region, Laramie, Wyoming recorded their 4th warmest Spring and Fargo, North Dakota tied for 7th.

Precipitation

Precipitation in May was typical of springtime, scattered but also abundant. The areas that did receive rainfall were often over 150 percent of their normal, with some localized amounts exceeding 10 inches this month.

The late April tornado outbreak in eastern Nebraska transitioned into a very wet month for that part of the state. This active pattern peaked on the 21st when a particularly heavy band of precipitation dropped large amounts of rain. Fremont recorded their 2nd highest single-day total of 6.32 inches (16.05 cm) and the 4th wettest month in their 131-year record. Nearby, Omaha was also impacted by the heavy rainfall and observed 11.13 inches (28.27 cm) to fall just shy of their wettest May on record.

Parts of the Dakotas also received above-normal precipitation, with areas recording more than 7 inches. Sisseton, South Dakota ranked 6th wettest this month, with 5.69 inches (14.45 cm) falling. Across the border, in North Dakota, Fargo placed 8th with 5.92 inches (15.04 cm).

Among those who missed out this month were the areas in and around Cheyenne, Wyoming. The city only measured 0.34 inches (8.64 mm) to rank 7th driest. Nearby Laramie fared slightly better with 0.57 inches (14.48 mm) but also ranked 7th.

Drought

The continual rounds of heavy precipitation have greatly improved drought conditions across the High Plains in recent months. Some parts of the west experienced degradation this month, but the region saw a reduction of over 9 percent in D0 to D4 (abnormally dry to exceptional drought conditions).

The drought that had gripped Nebraska since 2021 is nearly erased. D2 (severe drought) has been eliminated from the state for the first time since June 1st, 2021. This is also a drastic shift from last year when close to 11 percent of the state was engulfed by D4. Conditions are likely to continue to improve in the state, with standing water common across the eastern part of the state.

Near-record precipitation in North Dakota led to significant improvements, with D0-D4 reduced by 29 percent this month. Only a small sliver of drought conditions remains in the western border, with over 80 percent of the state drought-free.

The lone source of concern, once again, in the region is western Kansas. Two small patches of D3 (extreme drought) were reintroduced, but it could be short-lived due to recent rains. Elsewhere in the region, other improvements and degradation were observed.

For more information, please visit the High Plains Regional Climate Center Home Page.

South (Information provided by the Southern Regional Climate Center)

Flooding, tornadoes, hail, and winds severely impacted large swaths of the Southern Region during May.

Temperature

Temperatures were above normal for the entirety of the Southern Region during May, with the greatest departures being recorded in South Texas where most stations were four to eight degrees F above normal. The relatively cool spot in the Region was the combined Texas and Oklahoma Panhandles where temperatures were normal to two degrees F above normal. Statewide rankings were above normal for all six states and the Southern Region as a whole, with four states being in the top ten: Mississippi (5th warmest, out of 130 years), the Southern Region as a whole (5th warmest), Louisiana (6th warmest), Texas (6th warmest), Arkansas (7th warmest), Tennessee (18th warmest), and Oklahoma (21st warmest). The warmest recorded temperature in the Region for May was 115 degrees F, which occurred at Falcon Dam, Texas on May 20th and Rio Grande Village, Texas on May 28th. Seven long-term stations, all in Texas, set records for highest maximum monthly temperature during May. The greatest difference between the old and new records was at Harlingen Rio Grande Valley Airport in Texas, which broke the old record of 103 degrees F set in 1999 with 107 degrees F on May 26th. No long-term stations set records for lowest minimum monthly temperature during May, though 27 long-term stations across the Region set records for highest minimum monthly temperature during May affecting the states of Texas, Louisiana, Arkansas, and Mississippi.

Precipitation

Precipitation was well above normal for the majority of the Southern Region during May, with below normal precipitation largely confined to Deep South and West Texas where stations ranged from five to 70 percent of normal for the month. Statewide rankings were above normal for all six states in the Southern Region, including one top ten: Tennessee (6th wettest), Louisiana (16th wettest), the Southern Region as a whole (17th wettest), Texas (26th wettest), Mississippi (42nd wettest), Oklahoma (43rd wettest), and Arkansas, (48th wettest). Four stations, all CoCoRaHS sites and all in Texas, recorded more than 25 inches of precipitation in May: near Mongomery, TX (30.99 inches), Huntsville 1.3 SSE (30.02 inches), Huntsville 11.5 WSW (26.66 inches), and near Livingston (25.37 inches). Waco, Texas, with 122 years of records, had its all-time wettest month (15.28 inches). Three stations, all CoCoRaHS and all in Texas, received more than 11 inches of accumulated precipitation in a single day: Huntsville 1.3 SSE (12.51 inches, May 2nd), near Spring (11.5 inches, May 3rd), and near Tomball (11.14 inches, May 3rd). Ten long-term stations set single day accumulation records in May across Texas, Arkansas, and Mississippi, the highest total being 9.05 inches at Huntsville on May 2nd, which broke the old record of 7.65 inches set in 1908.

Drought/Flooding

During May, 69 percent of the Southern Region remained drought free as of May 28th according to the US Drought Monitor. Areas experiencing drought include Deep South Texas, Central Texas, West Texas, the Texas and Oklahoma Panhandles, northern Oklahoma, and northeastern Arkansas. One class degradation in drought conditions were common in the Texas and Oklahoma Panhandles, and Deep South Texas. One to three class improvements were noted across northern Oklahoma, Central Texas, northern Arkansas, northwestern Mississippi, eastern Tennessee, and western Tennessee. With ample spring precipitation and suitable temperatures in winter wheat production areas (Texas, Oklahoma, and Arkansas), the condition of winter wheat crops improved over this time last year, though Texas is lagging behind the other wheat producers in terms of crop condition. As of May 26th, the USDA reported the percentage of winter wheat crops as being in good to excellent condition at the state level: Arkansas (65 precent), Oklahoma (53 percent), and Texas (36 percent).

Along with the high precipitation totals during May in many areas, flooding was unfortunately present in the Southern Region this month. Over the period from April 28th to May 7th areas of San Jacinto, Walker, Polk, and Trinity counties in Texas received over 25 inches of precipitation, leading to devastating river flooding in the area and downstream towards Houston. As of May 3rd there were nearly 220,000 acre feet of excess water in Lake Livingston, Texas, which was the highest total since 1995 and higher than the level seen during Hurricane Harvey in 2017. Thousands of people were evacuated from flood areas, hundreds of homes were destroyed, and thousands more damaged. The true extent and total of the damages will not be known for some time. Severe weather continued to impact East Texas throughout the month and periodic episodes of flooding were common, including a round of severe weather on May 28th that led to flooding and power outages across Houston, Texas and included one fatality at a construction site due to a roof collapse.

Notable Weather

Severe weather impacted all six states in the Southern Region during May. Especially hard hit were the states of Oklahoma and Texas. On May 6th a very damaging EF4 struck the area near Barnsdall, Oklahoma leading to two fatalities; the system went on to produce severe weather across the Region over the next two days leading to tornadoes, hail, flash flooding, and high winds over portions of Central Tennessee. On the On May 16, 2024, an especially strong and long-lasting band of storms, known as a derecho, charged across Central Texas and struck Houston. The storm spawned tornadoes and destructive winds that reached 100 miles per hour. It shattered windows, tore roofs off homes, and toppled trees and power lines. At least eight fatalities were linked to this event and nearly one million homes and businesses in the Greater Houston area lost power, according to news reports. On May 25th an EF3 tornado struck Montague, Cooke, and Denton Counties in Texas; at least 200 homes were destroyed, and seven fatalities were associated with this storm. Additionally for the Houston area another round of severe weather on May 28th with strong winds, hail, and heavy rains impacted the metro area; the storm was responsible for at least one death in Montgomery County Texas.

There were 96 confirmed tornadoes in the Southern Region during the month of May, impacting all six states in the Region. The counts and ratings of the tornadoes were: 12 EF0, 60 EF1, 16 EF2, 7 EF3, and 1 EF4. There were likely more EF0 tornadoes that went unsurveyed. In total there were 18 fatalities and 228 injuries associated with these storms. Fatal tornadoes occurred in Oklahoma, Arkansas, Texas, and Tennessee. The three storms contributing the most to this total were: the EF4 tornado on May 6th that led to 33 injuries and two deaths near Barnsdall, Oklahoma; the EF3 tornado across Montague, Cooke, and Denton counties in Texas that led to 100 injuries and seven fatalities; and an EF3 tornado in Boone County, Arkansas that led to one injury and four fatalities. There were 810 hail reports across the Region in May with the largest being 6.25 inches in Johnson City, Texas on May 10th, which approached the Texas state record of 6.416 inches which fell in Hondo in 2021. There were 983 severe wind reports across the Region in May with the fastest being 95 mph at The Colony, Texas on May 28th and near Tahoka, Texas on May 29th.

For more information, please visit the Southern Regional Climate Center Home Page.

West (Information provided by the Western Region Climate Center)

Conditions were generally cooler and drier than normal across the West during May. Strong low pressure and storminess persisted for much of the month over the northern tier of the West bringing with it well-below normal temperatures for much of the northern Great Basin and northern Rockies. Extremely dry conditions, not uncommon for this time of year, prevailed throughout the Southwest with little drought relief for Arizona and New Mexico.

Temperature

Temperatures were two to six degrees Fahrenheit below normal for much of the Pacific Northwest, northern Great Basin, and northern Rockies. Parts of southern Idaho, northern Utah, and southwest Montana saw monthly mean temperatures in the bottom ten percent of all years. Pocatello, Idaho saw its sixth coldest May since records began at 50.5 degrees Fahrenheit and 3.7 degrees Fahrenheit below normal; Salt Lake City, Utah recorded a monthly mean temperature 2.7 degrees Fahrenheit below normal. Parts of the Southwest saw above normal temperatures for May. Las Vegas, Nevada had its tenth warmest May on record at 80.1 degrees Fahrenheit, 2.8 degrees Fahrenheit above normal; Cavern City airport, in southeast New Mexico, was 3.7 degrees Fahrenheit above normal for the month and the sixth warmest on record.

Precipitation

Precipitation was above normal for parts of Oregon, central and northern California, and most of Montana. Southern Montana east of the Rockies was particularly wet with several locations in the top ten wettest month of May on record; Billings logged 3.87 inches of precipitation for month at 164 percent of normal and Forsyth received 7.51 inches at 257 percent of normal. Below normal precipitation occurred in parts of all western states with large areas of zero to 25 percent of normal in Nevada, Arizona, southern California, southern New Mexico, and much of Utah. Zero precipitation was observed for many locations in the desert Southwest which is not all that uncommon for May. Cavern City airport, in southeast New Mexico, received just 0.01 inches of precipitation for the month which is tied for the fifth driest on record and is 1.14 inches below normal. The hot and dry conditions in southern New Mexico have worsened drought and is the only part of the West with exceptional drought (D4) present.

Drought

According to the U.S. Drought Monitor (USDM) at the end of May, 19 percent of the West was in drought. No areas of drought are found in California, Nevada, and Oregon. Areas of extreme (D3) and exceptional (D4) drought are found in southern New Mexico and a small pocket of D3 is found near the northern Idaho-northwest Montana border. Drought expanded in parts of Washington and improvements were made in parts of Oregon and Montana.

Alaska Summary

May temperatures were one to four degrees Fahrenheit below normal for much of Alaska with isolated locations seeing departures up to nine degrees Fahrenheit below normal. Iliamna, in southwest Alaska, one of the coldest locations, in relative terms, with a departure of 9.2 degrees Fahrenheit below normal and a mean monthly temperature of 37.1 degrees Fahrenheit. King Salmon airport was 4.3 degrees Fahrenheit below normal for the month and Kotzebue was 3.5 degrees Fahrenheit below normal. Wetter than normal conditions occurred in much of the southern half of the state, including the Panhandle with drier than normal conditions in northwest Alaska and the southern extent of the Aleutian Islands. Juneau had its third wettest May with 6.9 inches of precipitation, 197 percent of normal, Fairbanks recorded 1.08 inches of precipitation for the month, 200 percent of normal, and Anchorage received 1.04 inches, 160 percent of normal. Dutch Harbor, in the Aleutians, saw just 25 percent of normal precipitation with 1.05 inches recorded for the month.

Hawaii Summary

Most of Hawaii saw above normal precipitation for May except for the northeast coast of the Big Island and parts of Molokai and Lanai. Oahu had an extremely wet month with many stations reporting more than 200 percent of normal precipitation. A slow-moving Kona Low set up to the northwest of Hawaii and brought heavy rainfall, flooding, and rockslides May 14-17. Honolulu had its second wettest May on record with 4.90 inches of precipitation, 598 percent of normal, with most of that falling in a 3-day period. On the east shore of Oahu, Kaneohe Bay received 10.34 inches of precipitation and broke the May total precipitation record by over three inches. Oahu was not in drought at the beginning of May; however, much of the Big Island was in moderate (D1) or severe (D2) drought at the beginning of May and heavy rainfall during the month substantially reduced the spatial extent of drought on the island. At the end of May just 8.24 percent of Hawaii was in drought according to the U.S. Drought Monitor.

Notable Weather

Significant early May snowfall in the Sierra Nevada: A late season cold snowstorm brought heavy snowfall to the northern Sierra Nevada. The Central Sierra Snow Lab, located on Donner Summit, California, received 26.4 inches of snow in 24 hours May 4-5. Remarkably, this was the snowiest day (24-hour period) of the entire season.

For more information, please go to the Western Regional Climate Center Home Page.


Citing This Report

NOAA National Centers for Environmental Information, Monthly National Climate Report for May 2024, published online June 2024, retrieved on July 16, 2024 from https://www.ncei.noaa.gov/access/monitoring/monthly-report/national/202405.