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News

There’s a lot going on at NCEI. Discover more about us and Earth’s climate, oceans, coasts, and geophysics in these featured news stories.
Displaying 41 - 50 of 991
September 24, 2018
Updated March 25, 2024

Monitoring and Studying Harmful Algae

Understanding harmful algal blooms requires efforts by many organizations and NOAA to monitor and study their occurrence.

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March 29, 2016
Updated March 22, 2024

When to Expect Your Last Spring Freeze

Based on 30 years of climate records, our map shows when you can expect to see temperatures dip to 32°F or below for the last time.

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March 21, 2024

U.S. Drought: Weekly Report for March 19, 2024

Moderate to exceptional drought covers 17.8% of the United States including Puerto Rico.

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March 21, 2024

Marie Tharp

Learn about Marie Tharp, a pioneering ocean mapper who discovered the Mid-Atlantic Ridge and proved the validity of the theory of continental drift.

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March 20, 2024

NASA DEVELOP Welcomes Spring 2024 Interns

Meet NASA DEVELOP’s spring 2024 interns at NCEI and learn about their exciting research.

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March 14, 2024

Assessing the Global Climate in February 2024

The global land and ocean temperature departure from average for February 2024 was the highest on record.

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March 8, 2024

Assessing the U.S. Climate in February 2024

In February, the average contiguous U.S. temperature was 41.1°F, 7.2°F above the 20th-century average.

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March 7, 2024

U.S. Drought: Weekly Report for March 5, 2024

Moderate to exceptional drought covers 18.3% of the United States including Puerto Rico.

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February 29, 2024

U.S. Drought: Weekly Report for February 27, 2024

Moderate to exceptional drought covers 18.1% of the United States including Puerto Rico.

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February 28, 2024

Hang On, What’s Not Normal About February 29?

How does Leap Day disrupt the U.S. Climate Normals? NCEI scientists would tell you that it’s much more complicated than it seems.

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